Call of Leadership

The Call of Leadership

Lawry’s Pasties has been a family-run business since 1946, specializing in traditional Cornish pasties and maintaining the original recipe through four generations. Located in Marquette, Michigan, Pete and Addie Lawry share their journey of rebuilding the business after a devastating fire in the strip mall where their shop was located. They used resourcefulness and determination to start over, which included using equipment from Pete’s mother’s shop.

With winter months being slow for tourism, Pete and Addie came up with a clever way to keep their business going while reaching UP transplants from around the nation year-round.

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Show Notes:

00:00 Welcome to Total Michigan

01:24 The History of Lawry’s Pasties

02:26 What is a Pasty?

03:38 Generational Business Challenges

07:55 Rebuilding After the Fire

15:15 Shipping Pasties Nationwide

20:09 Local Favorites and Unique Offerings

24:33 How to Connect with Lawry’s Pasties

Transcript
Pete Lawry:

There was a fire in the strip mall.

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:

And our business burned

right to the ground.

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:

So we really lost everything

and started over from scratch.

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Cliff Duvernois: Why not just hang it up

and say, you know, I'm going to go flip

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:

Pete Lawry: That's what everybody asked.

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:

Aren't you ready to just work

in the mine or do something

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:

else and I said no i'm not.

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So we just bought some used

equipment and started over.

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Cliff Duvernois: Hello, everyone, and

welcome back to Total Michigan, where

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we interview ordinary Michiganders

doing some pretty extraordinary things.

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I'm your host, Cliff Duvernois.

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So when you make a trip up to the

Upper Peninsula, you cross the bridge.

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The one thing that you are going to

get hammered with constantly as you're

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driving around is these signs for pasties.

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They are everywhere.

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And what I wanted to do is I

wanted to come to the middle of

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the Upper Peninsula, so to speak.

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And find someplace that has

been doing it for a long time.

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Doing it extremely well, loved by not

only tourists but as well as the locals.

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And when I went to Marquette,

I found Lawry's pasties.

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Well rated online, everybody loves them.

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And I thought, you know what, these

would be the perfect people to come on

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and talk to us about this UP delicacy.

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So with that being said, I

would like you like to introduce

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you to Pete and Addy Lawry.

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Pete, how are you?

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I'm doing well.

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Thank you for asking.

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Addy, how are you?

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So if you would just tell us really

quick what is Lawry's pasties?

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Pete Lawry: Addie's the fourth

generation pasty makers.

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:We started in:

original shop West of Ishpeming.

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:e are been in Marquette since:

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We still make the original pasty,

the original way that my grandmother

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:made it back in the:

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Cliff Duvernois: if you would, talk to us

about, why did they start the pasty shop?

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Why even go in that

route in the first place?

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What made them open up their doors?

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Pete Lawry: My grandparents

had moved to Lansing.

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And they wanted to get back

to the Upper Peninsula.

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:And so in:

the war, they came back.

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And my grandmother was a wonderful cook.

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They opened a little cafe

next to the blueberry mine.

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Out west of Ishmael and Ely township.

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And she made packed pails for the miners

when they went down into the mine.

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And she specialized in pasties once a

week and everybody loved her pasties.

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eventually, it just became pasties.

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That's all they did.

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Cliff Duvernois: Why don't you

talk to us about what is a pasty?

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So

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Pete Lawry: So it is beef and potatoes and

onions and rutabaga, our recipe, which is

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the original Cornish version of a pastie.

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It's wrapped in a crust.

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It's similar to a pot

pie, but it's dry inside.

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There's no gravy.

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I don't mean to say dry.

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It's It's just doesn't have gravy in it.

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So it's more like a

sandwich than a pot pie.

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But it's served hot.

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And it's wrapped in a crust

and we make them by hand still.

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After all these years.

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Cliff Duvernois: Cause that's

a thing I just learned today.

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is that there's the Finnish version

and then there's the Cornish version.

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So yours is Cornish.

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Pete Lawry: The Cornish version and

they originated in Cornwall, but,

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Cliff Duvernois: Now, am I going to get

some emails from some Finnish people

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Pete Lawry: Possibly Finnish people.

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There are a lot of finish people in this

area that work in the mines as well, and

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they mainly put carrots in their version.

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I would say.

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Addie Lawry: That's the biggest

difference where the Cornish use

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rutabaga and the Finnish use carrots.

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Up here at least.

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Cliff Duvernois: Your

grandma opens the business.

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And at some point in time, it's

passed down to your parents.

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Pete Lawry: Yes.

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In the fifties, my father opened

it, came back from serving.

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And he was in England in the Air Force.

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And when he came home, he reopened

the shop and and then met and married

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my mother and they ran it together

until, well, they, they ended

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up getting divorced in the, 70s.

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And my mother took over it and, um.

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We all worked since I was in third grade

when I started working in the business.

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Cliff Duvernois: Child

Labor is cheap labor.

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Addie Lawry: Yep.

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Pete Lawry: And Addie too,

along with her three brothers.

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Addie Lawry: I don't know if there's a

better way to grow up than in a pasty shop

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Pete Lawry: to work with me every

Saturday and whenever because I

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worked all the time back then.

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Cliff Duvernois: Now, so

you grew up in the business.

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Pete Lawry: I did.

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Cliff Duvernois: Why did you

decide to step in and take over the

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family business versus, you know,

like I dream about these things.

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They chase me in my dreams.

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You know, I want out.

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I want to, go, save the whales or

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Pete Lawry: No, I always, I always

wanted to stay in the business

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from the time I was a little kid.

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Cliff Duvernois: What is it about the

business that that attracts you to it?

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Pete Lawry: It's just

a way of life for me.

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It's what I've known all my life.

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I just, it's all I've ever done.

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Addie Lawry: There's a pride that

comes with too, being able to take over

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something that's the fourth generation

And continuing on the family legacy and.

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I don't know.

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There's something special about

being surrounded by family

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and continuing on the legacy.

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Cliff Duvernois: people you love.

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Yes.

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Because now you're fourth

generation, Addy, right?

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You're primed to take

over the business too.

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Was there any ever thought in

your brain at some point, you're

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thinking to yourself, Man, I am

out of here as soon as I turn 18.

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I'm not making,

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Addie Lawry: Not really.

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No, we were, um,

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I had a couple other jobs.

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I worked at a school for a little bit.

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But we both knew, I think, the last straw.

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He just looked at me and said,

okay, you coming back now it's time

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And I

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Pete Lawry: Yeah.

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It's actually only been

a few years since she's

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Addie Lawry: been about five years.

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So,

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and I came and officially came back

and started taking things over.

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Cliff Duvernois: That's great.

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And In doing this, I guess

I got to ask the question.

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I'll ask this to you first, Pete, is

because your parents ran it for a while.

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And then you were taking over the

business and what was some of the

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things that you learned or something

that really surprised you when

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you took over the family business?

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Pete Lawry: Well, for one thing, I wasn't

I didn't really know what I was doing

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when I took over the, I thought I did.

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But I was a young kid in my twenties.

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So you just jump in and do things as

it's always been done without really

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knowing what comes with growth, what

comes with, I moved to Marquette.

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the original business is still open

in Ishmael and my brother runs it.

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But I ran into some hurdles as a young

kid that I wasn't really aware of.

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I thought I knew more than I did.

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business end of it.

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I just wanted to make pasties.

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Because I knew people liked them.

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And I did a good job with it.

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But, when it came to expanding and

the business side of it, there was

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a lot to learn that I didn't know.

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Cliff Duvernois: Like the

whole cashflow management

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Pete Lawry: Yes.

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employees, raising prices, keeping up

with costs, inflation, all those things.

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Right.

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Cliff Duvernois: And what about you Addy?

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When you started taking over

the business, What are some of

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the things that surprised you?

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Addie Lawry: I didn't have the

hardships I don't think my dad had.

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Cause I don't know.

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He's wonderful.

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And I think we work really we

work really well as a team.

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And if there's ever anything,

you know, we, troubleshoot

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really well together, I think.

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And, I don't know.

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I couldn't imagine a better role model

to learn to take things over than him.

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Cliff Duvernois: Certainly.

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And it's gotta be good too because

with you both being co-owners so

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to speak that a lot of the problems

you're discussing it's not like

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your treating like a parent child

relationship where you have to protect

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the child It's we're in this together.

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So let's collaborate.

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Addie Lawry: Yeah.

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It's his retirement in my future.

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So, you know, we both have a stake.

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Cliff Duvernois: go.

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There you go.

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Awesome.

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Love that.

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as the business is ticking along, right?

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And you've got your, you've got

your location, you've got it built.

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:During the:

had a pretty big problem

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Pete Lawry: We did.

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Yeah, we had been open

for about four years.

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And the, there was a

fire in the strip mall.

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And our business burned

right to the ground

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We lost everything.

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We were underinsured.

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We were just starting out.

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We were in our twenties.

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We had three I think out

of four kids at that time.

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And my wife, who is a nurse, was working

in the business with me at the time.

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So we really lost everything

and started over from scratch.

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We reopened two years later in

a new, in this existing, strip

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mall that we're in right now.

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But after they rebuilt.

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It started over.

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Cliff Duvernois: So the question I got

for you then is, you know, with everything

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:

burning to the ground, like you come over

here and it's just nothing but ash, right?

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First off, you've just got to be crushed.

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Pete Lawry: Yeah, it

was pretty devastating.

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Cliff Duvernois: And then To

make the decision that we're

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going to try this again.

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Why not just hang it up and say,

you know, I'm going to go flip

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Pete Lawry: That's what everybody asked.

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Aren't you ready to just work

in the mine or do something

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else and I said no i'm not.

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So we just bought some used

equipment and started over.

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My mother had the Ishpeming

shop still at that point.

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So I would go up there and cut meat

and grind meat and use some of her

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equipment that I couldn't afford to buy.

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So after hours, I would close

the shop, go up there, do my prep

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work, come back in the morning.

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My wife would come in and bake

in the mornings and get started.

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She would take kids with her, and

the ones that weren't in school.

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And then I would get the other

ones off to school and meet

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her here and we would switch.

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But it was, it's a way of

life and I didn't, couldn't

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imagine doing anything else.

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Cliff Duvernois: That's actually quite

clever and resourceful that you were

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using the equipment from your mom's shop.

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Pete Lawry: Yeah, it's all I, it's the

only way I could really stay in business.

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Cause I couldn't afford

to buy all new equipment.

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I bought ovens.

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I bought some used coolers

um, to get started.

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But we really didn't have much.

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Cliff Duvernois: And then as you're

going through this, so you, so this

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location had burned to the ground.

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But you actually opened up in another

location for a short while, right?

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Pete Lawry: We had another little shop,

out in Harvey which is 15 miles from here.

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Not quite, 10 miles, maybe.

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But it never really took off.

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It was a bad location.

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So we wanted to get back here.

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So that's where we took that

used equipment that we had there

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and moved back into this space.

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Cliff Duvernois: And by that

time they had rebuilt this little

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Pete Lawry: strip mall.

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They had rebuilt.

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Yeah.

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So I

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It is.

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It's a great location.

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:ve been here for, well, since:

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it's back, back in this spot.

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Cliff Duvernois: And then from there

it's just a matter of just keeping your

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customers happy, keeping the doors open

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Pete Lawry: we've been doing the same

thing, consistently over all the years.

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We haven't changed a thing.

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Our recipe is the same.

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The way we make our pasties is the same.

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We've got some new equipment, but

we still make everything by hand.

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Cliff Duvernois: So when you talked before

about focusing on making a great pasty,

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What, tell me, what does that, include?

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and I ask you that because

you've been here for decades.

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You've got people, obviously,

I mean, you're going to have

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tourists that come here, yes.

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They're going to see your sign,

they're going to want to stop in.

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But probably, I would bet you dollars

to donuts that probably a bulk of

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your customers are also locals.

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And they have very discerning

palates when it comes to pasties.

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what goes into making a good pasty?

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I

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Addie Lawry: I think the biggest thing

is, keeping, like, the same vendors,

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and having good employees, and, like,

making sure our potatoes are all

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pretty, sourced pretty much locally.

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All of our meat, everything we try

and get, the same as we have, and

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keeping those, that quality up is huge.

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still using lard in the crust,

which a lot of people for a long

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time were really hard on the lard.

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But it's starting to come back

around, having everything, you know,

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we don't put any preservatives in.

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it's something that you can make

in your kitchen just as easily

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as we can make in our kitchen.

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Wouldn't, shouldn't say easy.

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It's a pretty complicated

process, there's a lot of peeling.

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There's a lot that goes into it.

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but yeah, just making sure that

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Pete Lawry: consistency,

quality freshness,

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Cliff Duvernois: A large

portion of your menu.

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I mean, I do see you've got some that

are a little bit off and I, and we'll

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talk about that in a little bit.

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But basically, like you said,

your recipe is the same as your

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grandmother started back in the day.

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You haven't tinkered with it.

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It's not like I'm coming in here

and, Oh, we have a Korean fusion

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pasty or a Mexican fusion pasty.

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It is, man.

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This is the pasty.

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This is it.

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This is the uP.

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It's

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Pete Lawry: It's the exact same recipe.

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Cliff Duvernois: Addie mentioned,

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Pete Lawry: as Addy mentioned, we

do have, um, several employees now.

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And so in morning, there morning, there

can be six or seven people sometimes.

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And it's making sure that

the seasoning is just right.

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Not too much, not too little.

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Um, We just had that issue where

you're, you're kind of go back over.

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Addie runs the kitchen and she

makes sure everything is mixed

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by hand, which can be tricky.

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We make batches of 50 of the classic

size in one, in one batch of pasties.

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So making sure it's mixed properly and

seasoned properly for every batch because

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:to:

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to 20, 25 batches of those some days.

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to make So it gets tricky to make sure

that everyone is going to be the same.

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Cliff Duvernois: Sure.

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For our audience, we're going to take

a quick break and thank our sponsors.

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When we come back, we're going to talk a

lot more about pasties and what you can

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expect when you come to Lawry's Pasties.

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We'll see you after the break.

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Cliff DuVernois (2): Are

you enjoying this episode?

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Well, I can tell you

there's a lot more to come.

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Cliff Duvernois: Hello everyone and

welcome back to Total Michigan where

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we interview ordinary Michiganders

doing some pretty extraordinary things.

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I'm your host Cliff Duvernois.

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Today we're at Lawry's Pasties and

I'm talking with Pete and Addie Lawry.

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And Pete, Addie, before the

break we were talking about what

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makes for a really good pasty.

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My question to you now is, you know,

as your business is growing and

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you know, you're getting their foot

traffic is starting to come back in.

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You know, you've rebuilt from the fire.

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You've got this nice, super nice location.

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So my question to you is,

at some point in time.

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You got the idea to start shipping these.

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How did that idea come about?

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Addie Lawry: People begging.

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Pete Lawry: Yeah well the

big thing is we are the UP.

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Everybody who's ever been to the

UP in January knows it's cold.

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There's lots of snow which is

wonderful if you like snow.

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But our big season is June,

July, August, September.

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People love to come to the UP in the

summer, not as much in the winter.

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So we're very busy all summer long.

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And we didn't really, our business drops

in half in January and February and March.

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So we needed something to really

bring in business those months

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when people that might love our

product, they come in the summer but

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they're missing it all winter long.

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So now they can buy online and

we send them all winter long.

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The snowbirds that go to Florida or

Texas, California we ship all over.

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Cliff Duvernois: So then I got to imagine

that's a great way for you to be able

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to create another revenue stream for

your business to make sure you've got

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more money coming in throughout the year

versus just hoping somebody stops by,

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Pete Lawry: right

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Cliff Duvernois: if

there's a six foot snow

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Pete Lawry: exactly you have a

snow day where you're getting three

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or four feet of snow in one day.

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You don't get a lot of foot traffic.

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So this way we we still

are busy all winter long.

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From christmas right through.

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you know tourists i come in in

the summer time will buy christmas

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gifts for their families that came

on vacation as a remembrance of

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the good old UP and Marquette.

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It's such a wonderful place.

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And it's a good way to remember

their vacations and coming here.

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Cliff Duvernois: Addie was telling

me before the microphones went

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hot that there's actually people

from the UP that have moved.

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And actually appreciate the

fact that you guys ship.

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Addie Lawry: I feel like a good portion

of our, our shipping customers are

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local Yoopers who ended up moving away.

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And just miss that.

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We do a lot of like 80th birthdays.

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We ship out, you know, that kind of thing.

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Like people who grew up here, moved

away and just still love the pasties.

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And like my dad was saying, it's a good

remembrance of your childhood and those

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days and that good comfort food, the good

wholesome, you know, meat and potatoes

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Cliff Duvernois: Slice of home.

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Pete Lawry: Yes, absolutely.

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Cliff Duvernois: And then so when you

have the the this idea and your customers

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are practically begging for it yes I

will pay for you to ship them to me.

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Talk to us about that process of

figuring out how to make that work.

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I mean you just throw a bunch of them

in the cardboard box send them on

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their way do you put like a plastic

sheet over top of them that protects

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them and keeps them separate is it

like an egg carton how does that work

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Pete Lawry: We have a down pat right now.

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We buy shipping coolers that are boxed.

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So it's in a styrofoam cooler in a box.

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We use dry ice on the top.

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So we have different size

coolers to fit different.

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We do an eight pack of

12 pack or a 24 pack.

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So we have the three coolers

that correspond with the size.

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We, we hand cut the dry ice, put a slice,

depending on how far it's going to go,

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:

so it'll last two to three to even four

days in the mail without thawing out.

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:

Um, we, We've got it pretty down pat.

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:

Cliff Duvernois: Now how did you come up

with the idea to be able to to do this.

387

:

Was it trial and error?

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:

Did you jump on YouTube and watch

some videos of someone else doing it

389

:

Pete Lawry: trial and error in

the beginning, trying to figure it

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:

out, especially with the website.

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You know, We just started

with people that would ask.

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:

Like Addie said, people call all the

time and say, can you send us some

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:

And we did start in

cardboard boxes a few times.

394

:

And we would next day air them in a

cardboard box and they'd usually be

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:

thought out by the time they got there.

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And it wasn't very successful.

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:

Now you feel bad if people spend

all that money and it doesn't work.

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:

Cliff Duvernois: Right.

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Pete Lawry: So we to figure out

ways to make sure it would work

400

:

and be successful and it is.

401

:

Cliff Duvernois: Did you ever wind

up shipping anything to yourself just

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:

to see what it would like when it

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:

arrived?

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:

Pete Lawry: Yeah, we

have, uh, we've done that.

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:

We've shipped to relatives, um,

friends that, that live away.

406

:

Um, We'll take a box and put

it in the office where it's

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:

going to be warm all the time.

408

:

And see how long it'll last.

409

:

Um, we've done lots of experiments

like that to make sure.

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:

And there is an occasional

box that will get lost.

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:

And we have to reship.

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:

But usually UPS does a great job.

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:

Um, we don't lose many packages.

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:

Um, we only a

415

:

Cliff Duvernois: driver

snacking somewhere right now.

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:

Pete Lawry: Yeah,

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:

Cliff Duvernois: ordering them.

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:

Pete Lawry: so yeah, it's been, it's

been a good, um, way to increase

419

:

our business in the winter time.

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:

And we do ship all year round.

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:

But our main shipping time is,

um, December, January, February.

422

:

Cliff Duvernois: So talk to us then about

cause of the ones the ones you got on the

423

:

menu talk to us about maybe some of the

favorites that locals come and ask for.

424

:

Addie Lawry: There is one pasty.

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:

I mean, a lot of, Um, pasty

places, especially, try and

426

:

push all the different flavors.

427

:

Um, People come in all the time

asking for a chicken pasty.

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:

Well, in our mind, that's,

that's a chicken pot pie.

429

:

That's not a pasty.

430

:

You know, a pasty is Beef,

potato, rutabaga, and onion.

431

:

And, you know, that's it.

432

:

And throughout the years, you

know, we're, we're trying to

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:

cater to other, like, vegetarian.

434

:

We do have a vegetarian pasty.

435

:

I'm hesitant to call it a pasty.

436

:

But we do have a vegetarian version,

we have a breakfast version.

437

:

And then we have the different

sizes of our, our classic beef.

438

:

Cliff Duvernois: guys have

vegetarians in the UP?

439

:

Addie Lawry: Not, not many, but we

440

:

Cliff Duvernois: I shouldn't say

441

:

Addie Lawry: I shouldn't say not

442

:

many, I have actually quite a few

friends who are vegetarians, so.

443

:

Cliff Duvernois: And, you know,

with that being said, if somebody

444

:

were to come here, right, they've,

you know, they've never been here

445

:

before, you know, what, what is that

experience for them like looking like?

446

:

Or maybe, you know, what are some things

that they should be thinking about

447

:

when they, when they come in here?

448

:

What are their expectations?

449

:

Talk to us about that whole.

450

:

Addie Lawry: There's a lot of people who

come in not knowing how to eat a pasty.

451

:

I know that that's kind of funny.

452

:

But traditionally it's,

it's a handheld meat pie.

453

:

You know, you eat it like a

hamburger right out of the

454

:

bag is the best way to do it.

455

:

Um, There's a lot of controversy

over what to put on a pasty.

456

:

Like, that's the biggest thing.

457

:

Is it gravy or ketchup?

458

:

Or, or nothing.

459

:

If you have a good one, generally

you don't need anything that's, you

460

:

know, the purest, um, technique.

461

:

But, yeah, um, my favorite way, you

know, right out of the bag, with a

462

:

squirt of ketchup on each bite, you know,

463

:

And everyone, everyone has their

own unique way of eating a pasty.

464

:

Some people put, you know, Chow

chow, relish, it doesn't, you

465

:

know, barbecue sauce, ranch,

466

:

Pete Lawry: best, best way to eat a pasty.

467

:

I do this still at least once a week.

468

:

First one's out of the oven in

the morning, nine o'clock ish.

469

:

Grab it, put it on my desk, cut it in

half, let it sit for about twenty minutes.

470

:

Each half, um, as it's

cooled but still fresh.

471

:

No ketchup, no gravy.

472

:

Just chow it right down.

473

:

And it's delicious.

474

:

Cliff Duvernois: See, I, I feel a

little bit deceived, because when I

475

:

ordered lunch, You put a fork on my

476

:

Addie Lawry: I did.

477

:

I did.

478

:

Cliff Duvernois: that thing

479

:

Pete Lawry: the

480

:

Cliff Duvernois: whole

time I was eating it.

481

:

I was like, man, this thing is hot.

482

:

How are

483

:

Addie Lawry: We'll We'll get

you one to take home too.

484

:

Cause That's good.

485

:

Just room temperature, let

it sit for a couple hours.

486

:

And eat it right out of

the bag on your way home.

487

:

Cliff Duvernois: That's a

yes because I love that idea.

488

:

Because I was so hungry when

I showed up at the shop today.

489

:

I was like, I just could not wait, but

that would have been the thing to do.

490

:

Now I got to know you

got to eat them by hand.

491

:

a hand delicacy.

492

:

Pete Lawry: Yes.

493

:

So we have a small line of oven

baked sandwiches that we have.

494

:

We have a lot of big

families that come in.

495

:

And a lot of them will claim, you know,

there's One or two of the children that

496

:

say, Oh, I, I don't want to eat a path.

497

:

I don't like pasties or blah, blah, blah.

498

:

So we have a few other things

that are on our menu besides just

499

:

pasties to kind of cater to that.

500

:

And we make really good sandwiches.

501

:

Addie makes the bread

every morning by hand.

502

:

Addie Lawry: yeah,

503

:

Every day

504

:

Yeah.

505

:

Everything in here is made by hand.

506

:

All of our meats cut by hand.

507

:

We do.

508

:

Speaking of sandwiches, we have a Cudighi,

which is very, um, native to the U.

509

:

P.

510

:

Pasties, you know, came from England.

511

:

A lot of people don't know what

a pasty is, but Cudighi is a UP

512

:

staple brought over by the Italians.

513

:

we make a homemade Cudighi patty here.

514

:

It's ground pork and a lot of different

spices that's, you know, ours is massive.

515

:

It's not one of the things that you

can just eat and go on with your day.

516

:

It's, uh, like, You can eat a sliver

of it, but if you're eatin the whole

517

:

thing, you better expect to take a nap,

518

:

cuz.

519

:

There's a food

520

:

Cliff Duvernois: coma.

521

:

And what was that again?

522

:

A Cudighi?

523

:

Addie Lawry: kudigy?

524

:

Cudighi, yum.

525

:

Cliff Duvernois: I've never

heard of such a thing.

526

:

Addie Lawry: Yeah, It's gaining

a little bit more popularity.

527

:

But it is pretty strictly a UP food.

528

:

Like I said, it's pork seasonings.

529

:

And then it's kind of

shaped out into a patty,

530

:

It's almost almost like a

hamburger patty, but elongated.

531

:

And then you serve it on, um,

our, our, um, homemade bread

532

:

with sauce, cheese and onion.

533

:

Cliff Duvernois: Learn

something new every day.

534

:

Have to try one of those, too.

535

:

Uh, And if somebody is listening to

this, and they want to come by and

536

:

check out what it is that you guys

have they want to check your place out.

537

:

What's what's the best way

for them to connect you?

538

:

Where can they find you?

539

:

Pete Lawry: We are

online at lawryspasties.

540

:

com, L A W R Y S P A S T I E S dot com.

541

:

And, uh, you can find us there

if you want to order mail order.

542

:

If you want to drive up to our

shop, we're in Marquette, in the

543

:

middle of Marquette, basically.

544

:

Um, Right on US 41, it's hard to miss.

545

:It's:

546

:

S.

547

:

Highway 41 in Marquette.

548

:

But we're right on the main drag

as you're coming through town.

549

:

We'd love to have you stop

in and try our pasties.

550

:

Cliff Duvernois: Awesome and if they

do order online typically how long

551

:

does it take for a turnaround of

552

:

Pete Lawry: We try to only ship on

Mondays or Tuesdays to make sure

553

:

they have the week to get there so

they're not sitting over a weekend.

554

:

But you can order for a delivery time

just about any time later in the week.

555

:

Um, but yeah, we ship every Monday,

556

:

Cliff Duvernois: any

557

:

Pete Lawry: you order by Monday,

we'll get 'em out that Monday.

558

:

Cliff Duvernois: Perfect.

559

:

Awesome.

560

:

uh Pete, Addie, thank you so much for

taking time to be on the show today.

561

:

Really appreciate it.

562

:

Addie Lawry: It.

563

:

Thanks so much for coming down

564

:

Cliff Duvernois: And for our audience, you

can always roll on over to TotalMichigan.

565

:

com and click on Pete and Addie's

interview and get the links

566

:

that they have mentioned above.

567

:

We'll see you next time when we

talk to another Michigander doing

568

:

some pretty extraordinary things.

569

:

We'll see you then.